Neon Waltz at Rock City

Abby Clarke/ February 26, 2018/ Latest On The Mic, Reviews/ 0 comments

Neon Waltz, a Scottish indie rock band, based as far north as you can get in John O’Groats, played at Rock City Basement last night for an intimate show. They were supported by Lois and Rosborough three dates into their UK tour following the release of their debut album “Strange Hymns” in August 2017.

Opening the show, to an unfortunately very empty venue, were rock trio quartet. Even as they started playing, the crowd seemed quite unenthusiastic but when lead singer John Selby began to sing, people soon began to congregate around the stage. They had a very 60’s American rock and roll sound to them and left the crowd pleasantly surprised.

Next up was Rosborough, a singer song writer all the way from Derry, Northern Ireland. Glenn Rosborough had a unique voice that captured the growing audience’s attention. He seemed relaxed and at ease on stage and broke up the set with some good-natured humour and could easily be performing at bigger venues soon. Every song went down well and although still a moderately empty venue, he filled the place with sound so that it didn’t feel empty at all.

Just before Neon Waltz took to the stage, more people entered the venue, presumably coming just to see the six-piece indie rock band who have been praised by NME for their hard work and unique, laid back, indie alternative sound. They opened with “Sundial” and asked everybody to move closer in, creating an intimate atmosphere. Lead singer Jordan Shearer is a passionate singer and had a nervous demeanour which works well for the band, inviting the crowd into their personal performance. They played songs from their album including the popular “Dreamers” and their overall stage presence brought to mind bands such as The Night Café and High Tyde.

Speaking to Jordan after the show, he was very pleased with how it went and excited for the rest of the UK tour which includes shows in London, Kilmarnock and Brighton. Now is the perfect opportunity for people to go and see them perform as Neon Waltz already seem too big for the stages they are playing and the opportunity to see them at small and intimate gigs may soon be a thing of the past.

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